Configuring Credentials

BETA

Configuration of Credentials and Service Accounts with D2iQ Dispatch

Credentials are used when a Dispatchfile is executed, to push images and clone source repositories. These credentials are attached to an individual service account that is specified when a Dispatch repository is created. The Dispatchfile’s tasks then have access to only those credentials that have been attached to the specified service account.

A Dispatch repository’s Dispatchfile is executed in the context of a specific Kubernetes service account. The Dispatchfile’s tasks use credentials attached to that service account in order to push/pull docker images from a registry or clone git repositories. These credentials are stored as Kubernetes secrets with special structure and annotations.

Create a service account

Before registering a new repository with Dispatch, you must create a service account and attach credentials to it.

  1. Create a service account using the dispatch CLI as follows:

    dispatch serviceaccount create team-1
    

    This creates a service account named team-1.

Setting up Github credentials

  1. Set up credentials for the team-1 service account to access the source control management service on behalf of your account.

    GitHub

    Create a Personal Access Token for your GitHub account. You must specify the following permissions:

    • FULL access to admin:repo_hook: used to register webhooks to report events to Dispatch.
    • FULL access to repo: used to pull and/or push source code whether public or private, report build statuses to your commits, etc.

    After creating the token, remember the secret value. Replace $GITHUB_TOKEN with the secret value in the following command:

    dispatch login github --service-account team-1 --user $GITHUB_USER --token $GITHUB_TOKEN
    

    NOTE: If your Kubernetes cluster endpoint presents a self-signed TLS certificates you must pass `--insecure-webhook-skip-tls-verify` to the `login github` command, otherwise GitHub will refuse to deliver webhook events to Dispatch.

    GitLab

    Create a Personal Access Token for your GitLab account. The token should have the following scopes:

    • api: used to register webhooks to report events to Dispatch and report build statuses to your commits, etc.
    • write_repository: used to pull and/or push source code whether public or private.

    After creating the token, remember the secret value. Replace $GITLAB_TOKEN with the secret value in the following command:

    dispatch login gitlab --service-account team-1 --user $GITLAB_USER --token $GITLAB_TOKEN
    
    BitBucket Cloud

    Create an App Password for your Bitbucket Cloud account. The app password should have the following permissions:

    • Repositories read and write: used to pull and/or push source code whether public or private, report build statuses to your commits, etc.
    • Pull requests read and write: used to obtain and/or update pull request information.
    • Webhooks read and write: used to register webhooks to report events to Dispatch.

    After creating the app password, remember the secret value. Replace $BITBUCKET_APP_PASSWORD with the secret value in the following command:

    dispatch login bitbucket-cloud --service-account team-1 --user $BITBUCKET_USER --app-password $BITBUCKET_APP_PASSWORD
    
    Bitbucket Server

    NOTE: Bitbucket Server does not support skipping TLS certificate verification for webhooks. If you use a self-signed certificate in your cluster, you must [add the certificate to Bitbucket Server](https://confluence.atlassian.com/bitbucketserver/if-you-use-self-signed-certificates-938028692.html). Or if you are using Konvoy, you could [set up a Let's Encrypt certificate](https://docs.d2iq.com/ksphere/konvoy/latest/security/letsencrypt/).

    Create a Personal Access Token for your Bitbucket Server account. The token should have the following permissions:

    • Projects: read
    • Repositories: admin

    These permissions allow Dispatch to do the following:

    • Perform pull request actions
    • Update repository settings and permissions
    • Push, pull, and clone repositories

    After creating the token, remember the secret value. Replace $BITBUCKET_TOKEN with the secret value in the following command:

    dispatch login bitbucket-server --service-account team-1 --user $BITBUCKET_USER --app-password $BITBUCKET_TOKEN
    

    NOTE: If your Kubernetes cluster endpoint presents a self-signed TLS certificates you must pass `--insecure-webhook-skip-tls-verify` to the `login gitlab` command, otherwise GitLab will refuse to deliver webhook events to Dispatch.

  1. Set up Git SSH credentials if you want to trigger a build locally.

    1. Generate an SSH key pair:

      ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -f dispatch.pem
      

      This generates two files:

      • The SSH private key dispatch.pem (never copy or share this file anywhere you do not trust).
      • The SSH public key dispatch.pem.pub which corresponds to the dispatch.pem private key file. This file is safe to copy or share publicly.
    2. Add the SSH public key to your source control management service.

      GitHub
      1. Visit https://github.com/settings/keys
      2. Click “New SSH key”.
      3. Give the key an appropriate title like “Dispatch test 1”.
      4. Run cat ./dispatch.pem.pub in your terminal, copy the output, and paste it in the “Key” text box on the page.
      5. Click “Add SSH key”.
      GitLab
      1. Visit https://gitlab.com/profile/keys
      2. Run cat ./dispatch.pem.pub in your terminal, copy the output, and paste it in the “Key” text box on the page.
      3. Give the key an appropriate title like “Dispatch test 1”.
      4. Click “Add key”.
      BitBucket Cloud
      1. Visit https://bitbucket.org/account/settings/ssh-keys/
      2. Click “Add key”.
      3. Give the key and appropriate label like “Dispatch test 1”.
      4. Run cat ./dispatch.pem.pub in your terminal, copy the output, and paste it in the “Key” text box on the page.
      5. Click “Add key”.
      BitBucket Server
      1. Click your profile picture at the upper-right corner of the web UI of your on-prem Bitbucket Server instance.
      2. Click “Manage account” in the drop-down manu to go to the “Account” page.
      3. Click “SSH keys” from the list manu.
      4. Click “Add key”.
      5. Run cat ./dispatch.pem.pub in your terminal, copy the output, and paste it in the “Key” text box on the page.
      6. Click “Add key”.
    3. Now that we’ve registered the SSH public key with the source control management service, we can add the corresponding SSH private key to the team-1 service account:

      dispatch login git --service-account team-1 --private-key-path ./dispatch.pem
      

Setting up Docker credentials

Set up credentials for the team-1 service account to access the docker registry service on behalf of your account.

  1. To store Docker registry credentials, run the login docker subcommand and specify the service account to attach the credentials to by mentioning username and password:

    dispatch login docker --service-account team-1 --username $YOURDOCKERUSERNAME --password $YOURDOCKERPASSWORD
    

    Alternatively, specify a non default registry endpoint as well:

    dispatch login docker --service-account team-1 --username $YOURDOCKERUSERNAME --password $YOURDOCKERPASSWORD --registry https://us.gcr.io
    

    Note The --password can be a token instead of docker password (useful for accounts protected by 2FA)