Prerequisites

Before you begin using DKP UI, you must:

Default StorageClass

To ensure the Git repository that Kommander ships with deploys successfully, the cluster where Kommander is installed must have a default StorageClass configured. Run the following command:

kubectl get sc
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The output should look similar to this. Note the (default) after the name:

NAME               PROVISIONER       RECLAIMPOLICY   VOLUMEBINDINGMODE      ALLOWVOLUMEEXPANSION   AGE
ebs-sc (default)   ebs.csi.aws.com   Delete          WaitForFirstConsumer   false                  41s
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If the StorageClass is not set as default, add the following annotation to the StorageClass manifest:

annotations:
  storageclass.kubernetes.io/is-default-class: "true"
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More information on setting a StorageClass as default can be found at Changing the default storage class in k8s docs.

Install Kommander on Konvoy

To customize a Kommander installation, see the configuration page for more details.

Before running the commands below, ensure that your kubectl configuration references the cluster on which you want to install Kommander, otherwise it will install on the bootstrap cluster. You can do this by setting the KUBECONFIG environment variable to the appropriate kubeconfig file’s location.

An alternative to initializing the KUBECONFIG environment variable as stated earlier is to use the --kubeconfig=cluster_name.conf flag. This ensures that Kommander is installed on the workload cluster.

Begin with this command:

dkp install kommander
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Verify installation

After the CLI successfully installs the components, you must wait for all HelmReleases to deploy.

The Kommander installation is a multi-step process: Flux installs first, then the Git repository spins up permitting Flux to consume further HelmReleases from that repository.

After running the install command above, HelmReleases begin to appear on the cluster.

kubectl -n kommander wait --for condition=Released helmreleases --all --timeout 15m
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This will wait for each of the helm charts to reach their Released condition, eventually resulting in something resembling this:

helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/centralized-grafana condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/dex condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/dex-k8s-authenticator condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/fluent-bit condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/gitea condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/grafana-logging condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/grafana-loki condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/karma condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kommander condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kommander-appmanagement condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kube-prometheus-stack condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kubecost condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kubecost-thanos-traefik condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kubefed condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kubernetes-dashboard condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/kubetunnel condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/logging-operator condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/logging-operator-logging condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/minio-operator condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/prometheus-adapter condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/prometheus-thanos-traefik condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/reloader condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/thanos condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/traefik condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/traefik-forward-auth-mgmt condition met
helmrelease.helm.toolkit.fluxcd.io/velero condition met
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You can check the status of a HelmRelease with:

kubectl -n kommander get helmrelease <HELMRELEASE_NAME>
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If you find any HelmReleases in a “broken” release state such as “exhausted” or “another rollback/release in progress”, you can trigger a reconciliation of the HelmRelease using the following commands:

kubectl -n kommander patch helmrelease <HELMRELEASE_NAME> --type='json' -p='[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/suspend", "value": true}]'
kubectl -n kommander patch helmrelease <HELMRELEASE_NAME> --type='json' -p='[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/suspend", "value": false}]'
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Access DKP UI

When all the HelmReleases are ready, use the following command to open the DKP UI in your browser:

dkp open dashboard
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This command opens the URL of the Kommander web interface in your default browser, and prints the username and password in the CLI.

If you prefer not to open your browser, or are running the DKP CLI from a host that does not have a browser installed, run this command to retrieve the URL used for accessing the DKP UI:

kubectl -n kommander get svc kommander-traefik -o go-template='https://{{with index .status.loadBalancer.ingress 0}}{{or .hostname .ip}}{{end}}/dkp/kommander/dashboard{{ "\n"}}'
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And, use the following command to access the username and password stored on the cluster:

kubectl -n kommander get secret dkp-credentials -o go-template='Username: {{.data.username|base64decode}}{{ "\n"}}Password: {{.data.password|base64decode}}{{ "\n"}}'
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